Holding Politicians Accountable

2 notes

If somebody wants to write me a $100,000 check to my campaign, great.

- Gov. Chris Christie (R-N.J.), calling for an end to limits on what individuals can give directly to candidates (Star-Ledger).

Just for reference: the median household income in New Jersey is $71,000 (it’s about $53,000 for the country as a whole)

Filed under Chris Christie New Jersey

15 notes

Happy Tax Day!
"Twenty-five profitable Fortune 500 companies, some with a history of tax dodging, spent more on lobbying than they paid in federal taxes between 2008 and 2012, according to Public Campaign analysis of data from Citizens for Tax Justice and the Center for Responsive Politics. Over the past five years, these 25 corporations generated nearly $170 billion in combined profits and received $8.7 billion in tax rebates while paying their lobbyists over half a billion ($543 million), an average of nearly $300,000 a day."
(Via Public Campaign)
 

Happy Tax Day!

"Twenty-five profitable Fortune 500 companies, some with a history of tax dodging, spent more on lobbying than they paid in federal taxes between 2008 and 2012, according to Public Campaign analysis of data from Citizens for Tax Justice and the Center for Responsive Politics. Over the past five years, these 25 corporations generated nearly $170 billion in combined profits and received $8.7 billion in tax rebates while paying their lobbyists over half a billion ($543 million), an average of nearly $300,000 a day."

(Via Public Campaign)

 

Filed under tax day lobbyists

8 notes

Politico Magazine: What John Roberts Doesn’t Get About Corruption

Zephyr Teachout’s latest:

"McCutcheon v. FEC, the landmark case that threw out aggregate limits on campaign spending last week, Chief Justice John Roberts made clear that for the majority of this current Supreme Court, corruption means quid pro quo corruption. In other words, if it’s not punishable by a bribery statute, it’s not corruption. This is a reasonable mistake to make at a dinner party. But it’s a disastrous mistake to make for democracy, when the stakes are so high."

Filed under Supreme Court McCutcheon v FEC

11 notes

Mitch McConnell’s “Sandbag Dinners”

Want to know how Washington works? Here’s an example from Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (via CNN):

His team built a fundraising strategy around that strength in the run-up to the last two elections. They invited Republican lobbyists to dinner with McConnell in a private room at Carmine’s, a family-style Italian restaurant in downtown Washington, with no apparent price of admission. But after spaghetti and meatballs, McConnell thanked everyone for coming, told them he needed them to contribute the maximum allowable in personal money ($30,800 in 2012) to the National Republican Senatorial Committee, and then sat back and waited. What followed was a long, pained silence, one of McConnell’s preferred negotiating tools. Then, one after another, attendees acquiesced. Organizers called these “the sandbag dinners.”

Filed under Mitch McConnell kysen fundraising Congress