Holding Politicians Accountable

Posts tagged big money

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The 1980s changed America. These were the years when corporations and wealthy individuals organized to fight back against the liberal forces that had dominated the ’60s and ’70s. Moneyed interests organized new groups, especially political action committees that were prepared to spend large sums to achieve their political objectives. This began the three-decade process that has made money the most important element of our public life, a form of pollution way beyond the reach of the Environmental Protection Agency.
Former Washington Post reporter Robert Kaiser in an oped this weekend: “How Republicans lost their minds, Democrats lost their souls and Washington lost its appeal.

Filed under big money pollution campaign finance

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Congressman Walter Jones (R-N.C.) on his primary opponent fundraising in DC: “This to me is what’s wrong with Washington. There’s too much money out here and it’s all about the money. Too many times policy is influenced by money. That’s why I’m an independent and I vote my conscience.” (Roll Call)

Congressman Walter Jones (R-N.C.) on his primary opponent fundraising in DC: “This to me is what’s wrong with Washington. There’s too much money out here and it’s all about the money. Too many times policy is influenced by money. That’s why I’m an independent and I vote my conscience.” (Roll Call)

Filed under Walter Jones North Carolina big money

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So why are Rep. Dave Camp’s colleagues upset about his tax reform plan being released this week?

Well:

Top Republicans tell us that a huge part of the anger about the plan’s release is that some of the industries that may be hit  – financial services, real estate, oil and gas, include big donors who could curb their support for the party in midterms.”

This doesn’t really seem like the best way to decide public policy.

Filed under taxes tax reform Congress big money

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“In a blow against the Supreme Court’s Citizens United ruling, the second-largest city in the U.S. sent a strong, if symbolic, message against corporate personhood and unlimited corporate spending on political campaigns.
"Los Angeles voters overwhelmingly passed Proposition C, a resolution that instructed local and state officials to promote the overturning of Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission. With 100 percent of precincts reporting by 3:16 a.m. Wednesday, Prop C had won 76.6 percent of the vote, according to the LA City Clerk’s unofficial results.”
(Huffington Post)

In a blow against the Supreme Court’s Citizens United ruling, the second-largest city in the U.S. sent a strong, if symbolic, message against corporate personhood and unlimited corporate spending on political campaigns.

"Los Angeles voters overwhelmingly passed Proposition C, a resolution that instructed local and state officials to promote the overturning of Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission. With 100 percent of precincts reporting by 3:16 a.m. Wednesday, Prop C had won 76.6 percent of the vote, according to the LA City Clerk’s unofficial results.”

(Huffington Post)

Filed under Citizens United big money Los Angeles

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Winning elections is more expensive than ever. Ironically, that makes it harder to ‘buy’ elections, in the conventional sense, because both sides in marquee elections raise so much cash that each marginal dollar becomes less consequential (principles of inflation apply). But it also means that candidates are required to spend an egregious and unprecedented share of their time getting rich people to donate. Having a Rolodex full of wealthy folks is a prerequisite for winning federal representation. It’s also a recipe for having your priorities shaped, if not determined, by hours spent going over rich-guy problems.
Derek Thompson, The Atlantic

Filed under big money campaign finance priorities