Holding Politicians Accountable

Posts tagged campaign finance

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More than 66,000 ads in U.S. House and Senate races aired through March 9, more than triple what candidates and allied groups aired during a comparable period four years ago, according to New York-based Kantar Media’s CMAG, which tracks advertising.
Bloomberg, “Obamacare Foes Run Nearly Half of Early Ads for Congress”

Filed under campaign finance politics money in politics

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New York is *this close* to passing Fair Elections campaign reform that would give everyday people more power in the political process by matching small dollar donations. Here’s our new TV ad that starts airing around the state.

The message“The time for action is now. New Yorkers have waited too long for this reform. The Governor’s proposed it in his budget and the Assembly passed it in theirs. The Governor must not yield to the Senate obstructionists.”

Filed under New York Fair Elections campaign finance

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It’s kind of like dating. Everybody has a good time, but people are not ready to get married.

- A Wall Street executive on politicians considering 2016 presidential runs “courting” big money financial industry donors (Bloomberg).

When people get married, they promise their partner “to have and to hold,” so we guess marriage is a good metaphor for campaign donors and elected officials. 

Filed under Wall Street campaign finance 2016 presidential

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Ready for a surprise? Money DOES equal access in Washington
Interesting new experiment that tested emails to members of Congress— one saying donors wanted meetings, another saying constituents want meetings:

"The results: Only 2.4 percent of the offices made the member of Congress or chief of staff available when they believed those attending were just constituents, but 12.5 percent did when they were told the attendees were political donors.
"Also, nearly one in five of the donor groups got access to a senior staffer, while just 5.5 percent of the constituent groups did. That means the donors had more than three times the access to top staffers than the constituents.”

Ready for a surprise? Money DOES equal access in Washington

Interesting new experiment that tested emails to members of Congress— one saying donors wanted meetings, another saying constituents want meetings:

"The results: Only 2.4 percent of the offices made the member of Congress or chief of staff available when they believed those attending were just constituents, but 12.5 percent did when they were told the attendees were political donors.

"Also, nearly one in five of the donor groups got access to a senior staffer, while just 5.5 percent of the constituent groups did. That means the donors had more than three times the access to top staffers than the constituents.”

Filed under politics campaign finance congress